Victim

How exactly does slut-shaming work?

Just pointing fingers at women who open their legs too easily for guys? But what about the males? What about the men who are so desperate to enter a girl?

With the messed up logic society has provided us, we point fingers at porn stars and people who get pregnant before marriage. But… what about the men?

I mean, you can’t really be a slut with no one else, you know? Why do people only look at the woman’s side of the case?

If she was raped, then everything about it is her fault. Who cares about the guy anyways? She will be haunted for the rest of her life because she won’t ever be able to escape that trauma. She will also have society pointing fingers at her no matter what. Maybe she’ll even never be able to trust a guy, denying herself happiness.

And the male? If caught, then he will be sent to jail. If he has money, he will be able to come out soon. But in jail, he may even brag about how he has raped this poor girl while that specific poor girl may be hating herself and feeling filthy.

But she would still be a slut because she should have said no, because she should have known how to fight off the man. And now she’s being shamed because of something a bastard has done to her. Logic.

Most of all, teenage girls are slut shamed all the time. I must admit, that not all teenage girls are innocent of this. Some do open their legs wide open for guys. But not everyone does. One girl may have tried it out, and ended up hating it. But who cares? You’re still a whore. Another girl may have been pressured into it and hates herself for it. But who cares? You are still a slut. Episodes like these happen way too much, way too often.

And this finger pointing really doesn’t help the girls. Would the world lose anything if we learned to support the girls? What if we tried to help them, whether it was getting them away from scary men or helping they get over their desperation for men? What does the world have to lose?

Word of the Day: venial
(adj.) able to be forgiven or pardoned; not seriously wrong, as a sin
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5 comments

  1. redexblogke · November 22

    Hey Hanny! Your passion about the subject is evident in your diction. Good job using rhetorical appeals in your writing (consciously or unconsciously).

    Be careful about being consistent in your noun usage. For example, in the fourth paragraph you said, “women’s”, but in the next paragraph “she”. The alternating of plural and singular nouns can be confusing to follow.

    Overall, great way to add your own voice to the prompt. I hope you’ll be able to keep up this passion in all your writing. Don’t forget to have a great rest of the week; keep battling the injustices of the world. ❤ Carmel

    Like

  2. Makenzie · November 22

    Hanny, thank you for being willing to confront society. Challenging stereotypes and patterns are the only way they are going to change, so thank you for being brave enough to do that. You present a good case here, giving lot’s of examples that demonstrate what you mean. I would agree with Carmel in that I got confused between the switching ‘women’ and ‘she’; were we talking about a specific woman or women in general? Overall, I think this ties in well with the prompt; great engagement and usage of real life situations! Love you 🙂

    Like

  3. sallyfire · November 25

    Hanny,
    I always love your honesty and bluntness on everything. We really do need more people like you! I like how you don’t mention the scarlet letter ONCE and still get away with tying it back to the book. I also like how you ask rhetorical questions throughout to get the reader thinking. It really did challenge me to wonder why we don’t try to help these girls instead of shame them.

    Some things about grammar:
    You don’t need a comma in this sentence–
    “I must admit, that not all teenage girls are innocent of this”.
    Also, you switch back and forth from using “you’re” and “you are.” Make sure to keep this consistent, depending on your tone!!

    Like

  4. noracpm · November 29

    I agree with this post. I agree that the slut shaming culture focuses on women and ignores men who behave in the same way. You constructed your argument logically and used questions to support your points effectively. This post stands well on its own, however given the specific prompt, you could’ve tied your topic more clearly to The Scarlet Letter. In your second to last paragraph you kept changing pronouns: using “she” as the subject in the scenario and “you” as the subject in the question. It would make the paragraph stronger to be consistent with pronouns. Also, the first question in your fourth paragraph could be better phrased; perhaps instead of “you can’t really be a slut with no one else” you could change it to “you can’t really be a slut without the help of someone else.” Overall, your position was coherently communicated.

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  5. Karith Magnuson · December 1

    Powerful, passionate, and thought-provoking post.

    Like

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